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Cy-Fair Schools, Sports, Students December 2016

| December 1, 2016

(L-R): Cypress Woods freshmen Tristan Wiesepape and Rahul Shanmughmam and sophomore Anand Iyer placed first in the Novice Team Division.

(L-R): Cypress Woods freshmen Tristan Wiesepape and Rahul Shanmughmam and sophomore Anand Iyer placed first in the Novice Team Division.

WILDCATS RACK UP AWARDS AT TAYLOR COMPUTER SCIENCE INVITATIONAL

The Cypress Woods High School computer science team collected multiple awards at the 18th annual Katy Taylor Invitational computer science contest on Oct. 29 at Taylor High School.

More than 50 Texas teams competed at the meet, with Cypress Woods winning the following awards:

Advanced Division: Individual results: first place – Walter Han, senior; first place – Steven Cheng, freshman; sixth place – Nathan Huckleberry, senior; and 10th place – Meggie Cheng, junior.

Team results: second place – seniors Walter Han and Nathan Huckleberry and junior Meggie Cheng; and third place – senior Arami Guerra, freshman Steven Cheng and sophomore Sammy Armstrong.

Novice Division: Individual results: first place – Tristan Wiesepapi, freshman; second place – Govind Chada, freshman; fifth place – Anand Iyer, sophomore; and seventh place – Rahul Shanmugham, freshman.

Team results: first place – sophomore Anand Iyer and freshmen Tristan Wiesepape and Rahul Shanmughmam; and third place – freshman Govind Chada, senior Hunter Obendorfer and sophomore Ryan Bietz.

“The Wildcat computer science team did well at the Taylor Comp Sci contest, which was a really well-run contest,” said Stacey Armstrong, Cypress Wood computer science teacher and team sponsor. “The advanced and novice programming teams put up great scores. The individual scores were our best scores of the year. The hard work is really starting to pay off. I am excited to see how the teams score the rest of the season.”

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Brett Stewart (right), Houston Texans marketing coordinator for youth football, congratulates Cypress Falls High School Head Football Coach for winning the Houston Texans Coach of the Week award.

Brett Stewart (right), Houston Texans marketing coordinator for youth football, congratulates Cypress Falls High School Head Football Coach for winning the Houston Texans Coach of the Week award. photo – Brayan Crescencio, Cypress Falls HS

CY FALLS’ EATON NAMED TEXANS COACH OF THE WEEK

(Text by Alise Maxie, Cypress Falls HS) Cypress Falls High School veteran Coach Kirk Eaton received the Houston Texans Coach of the Week award during the Golden Eagles’ practice Oct. 25. Brett Stewart, Texans marketing coordinator for youth football, accompanied by Texans cheerleaders Sasha and Julie, presented the award to Eaton in front of his team.

The Houston Texas Coach of the Week award, presented by Houston Methodist, is a weekly award given to a Houston-area coach who has been nominated by the community.

In recognition of the Golden Eagles’ 27-10 win over Cypress Woods on Oct. 7, the Texans presented Eaton with a $2,500 check for the Cypress Falls football program and a signed certificate from Texans Head Coach Bill O’Brien.

“From a student’s standpoint, getting to see their coach receive this award is huge,” Stewart said. “They get to see someone who they directly interact with each and every day get honored, and recognized in the community for doing something great.’”

This is not the first award presented to Eaton over his career. In 2015, he was named High School SportsZone Honda Coach of the Week and was one of 10 finalists for the Touchdown Club of Houston Coach of the Year award.

“I kind of take them all in stride, but there are about 71 players out there and 15 other coaches, so to just put my name on any one award is just silly,” Eaton said. “I’m very appreciative of the Texans and the program they have, but it’s more about the team.”

Eaton started coaching because of his high school coach, Amarillo High’s Larry Dippel. He was the youngest coach on the staff when he was hired at Cypress Falls, and has now been coaching for 22 years.

“Coach Dippel treated me the right way,” Eaton said. “He fostered a great relationship and when I thought of what I could do as a career, I just decided, what better profession than that? I’ve been doing it ever since.”

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Langham Creek seniors Alicia Benavides and Robert Jio explain their engineering project to community member Lesia Linton.

Langham Creek seniors Alicia Benavides and Robert Jio explain their engineering project to community member Lesia Linton.

STUDENTS FORGE STEM PATHWAYS THROUGH ENGINEER YOUR WORLD

CFISD high school students in engineering design and problem solving classes wrapped up their first design challenge of the school year recently, through the University of Texas’ UTeach Engineering curriculum program, Engineer Your World.

The innovative, yearlong high school course –– made possible through a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant –– is for students who want to learn about engineering and its role in shaping the world. The 2016-2017 school year marks the fourth year for the course to be offered.

In the initial design challenge, The Evolution of Imagery, students were tasked with building a pinhole camera for an arts program that works with disabled individuals with limited hand dexterity.

Langham Creek High School students in Marissa Logrono’s three class periods presented their designs in a symposium for professional engineers, parents and community members on Oct. 21.

“We had more engineers here than we’ve had in a long time,” Logrono said. “As I’ve seen, students are rising to the occasion. They’ve been able to talk about how the process became a product, how the product will work for the customer and how that becomes a cycle.”

Professionals from KBR, Flotek, Schneider Electric and Jill Smith Realty were among the visitors who asked questions to students after they presented their design: a reusable pinhole camera for an art camp that services people with disabilities. ‘

“I’ve enjoyed the varying designs and hearing the spontaneity of taking very crude materials and doing something with them while having the customer in mind,” said Carl Afton, technical service manager for Flotek. “It’s a good learning experience, and it gives them a good appreciation of science and engineering.”

Engineer Your World curriculum is in about 165 schools across the country including all CFISD high schools, and is offered with a dual enrollment option so students can earn three engineering elective credits at UT system schools. Marie Girardot, recruitment support specialist for the program, visited the Langham Creek symposium to see some of the seeds begin taking shape for potential careers.

“It definitely starts preparing students to get into that engineering thought process,” she said. “Throughout this course they’re developing these engineering habits of mind, how engineers think and how they would go about solving problems in the real world. That’s going to help them get the extra creativity and critical thinking skills they’ll need in engineering classes in college.”

Senior Rouie David said the project is a good stepping stone for a potential career in the industry.

“The big thing about this is not just what to do and how to do it, but how to learn from your mistakes,” he said. “We made a lot of mistakes but we made a lot of changes that benefited the final design.”

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Danish Elementary School fourth-grade student Thomas Chaney does “the worm” dance move at the Lights On Afterschool event on Oct. 20.

Danish Elementary School fourth-grade student Thomas Chaney does “the worm” dance move at the Lights On Afterschool event on Oct. 20.

DISTRICT SCHOOLS SIMULTANEOUSLY CELEBRATE AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS

Club Rewind, CFISD’s before- and after-school care program, joined programs around the United States in celebrating the Lights On Afterschool event on Oct. 20.

Lights On Afterschool is the only nationwide event celebrating afterschool programs and their role in keeping kids safe, inspiring them to learn and helping working families. More than 1 million Americans celebrate annually at more than 8,000 events across the country.

The Club Rewind programs at CFISD’s 72 participating schools simultaneously joined the celebration in a “Club Time Rally” featuring a flash mob dance to “Move Your Body” and student testimonials about how Club Rewindimpacted their lives. Student groups showed off their unique chants and cheers and parents stayed after for an open house.

“Collaborating on a nationwide effort was amazing! I love the idea of educating the general public on the value of afterschool programs,” said Kristina Perez, director of community programs. “We work hard at Club Rewind to keep children engaged during these critical hours. They have fun while continuing to improve their skills.

“The event was an honor to host at all 72 campuses. The staff members carried it out well. I especially loved that the students gave speeches about how Club Rewind impacts their life, in addition to inviting parents to participate with their children in regular activities. Parents even played dodge ball! We love what we do and the support we provide to families across CFISD.”

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(L-R): Le’Krystal Simon, Gary Hill, Nadezdha Michaca-Garcia, and Kesha Bolton, district coordinator for YMPA/YLPA/HOLA.

(L-R): Le’Krystal Simon, Gary Hill, Nadezdha Michaca-Garcia, and Kesha Bolton, district coordinator for YMPA/YLPA/HOLA.

CLUBS’ KICKBALL TOURNAMENT SUPPORTS FIGHT AGAINST BREAST CANCER

Members of the Young Men for Positive Action (YMPA), Young Ladies for Positive Action (YLPA) and Hispanic Organization for Leaders of America (HOLA) clubs throughout CFISD hosted the inaugural “Kickin’ It Pink” kickball tournament on Oct. 8 at Cypress Springs High School.

The event honored those who have fought the fight against breast cancer while inspiring camaraderie among the 150 students participating from the following seven campuses: Aragon and Campbell middle schools; and Cypress Creek, Cypress Falls, Cypress Lakes, Cypress Ranch and Cypress Springs high schools.

The event generated $120 for the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and the YMPA/YLPA/­HOLA steering committee continued its $1,000 fundraising goal with a “BUST the Bank” coin drive at each campus through October.

Current and former CFISD educators, nominated by members and sponsors from their respective campuses, were presented with “Survivor Awards” created by the Cypress Springs industrial technology class.

The “Kickin’ It Pink” tournament was co-sponsored by YMPA/YLPA/HOLA steering committee members Gary Hill of Cypress Springs and Le’Krystal Simon of Cook Middle Schools. Supporting committee members included Kesha L. Bolton of Dean Middle School, Nadezdha Michaca-Garcia of Cypress Park High School and Sherri Jacob of Campbell Middle School.

“It was a wonderful turnout,” Bolton said. “We look forward to next year’s, as it will be bigger and better! A big shout-out goes to the Cy Springs family for allowing us to use their facilities, and especially the industrial technology class for creating the beautiful ‘Survivor Award’ plaques. Also, a huge ‘thank you’ to Dean Middle School for providing the equipment for the games. The ‘Kickin’ It Pink’ tournament was an awesome event.”

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Senior Jordan Escobar, pictured with his mother, Frances Carrasquillo.

Senior Jordan Escobar, pictured with his mother, Frances Carrasquillo.

CYPRESS FALLS RAISES FUNDS, HONORS CANCER SURVIVORS AT FOOTBALL GAME

(Text by Abby Richardson, Cypress Falls HS) Cypress Falls High School students and staff presented a check worth $2,867.45 to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital prior to the Golden Eagles’ football game at Cy-Fair FCU Stadium on Oct. 1.

The funds, raised the last week of September by Cypress Falls’ Young Ladies of Positive Action (YLPA) group, came from teacher jeans passes and a pep rally. Book­ended by Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in September and Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, the Oct. 1 presentation honored survivors of both diseases on the field prior to the game.

Children at St. Jude receive free hospital care, treatment and lodging for parents. Some of the cancer patients will benefit from this donation, along with young minorities and other people with serious injuries. The YLPA generated excitement about the event and the help it gave to children.

“It’s a really good feeling knowing that all of our proceeds are going straight towards them,” said Humi Jackson, Cypress Falls YLPA president. “It’s been great considering that we raised almost $3,000 for them.”

Cypress Falls students have also raised funds for breast cancer research and the school community is still finding ways to give back to the less fortunate.

The school is trying to inspire other students and clubs to help out with the community. “We’re hoping student organizations will want to compete against each other so we can raise even more money next time,” said Tricia Charron, Cypress Falls assistant principal.

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Larry Barnes (left), Salvation Army Boys and Girls Clubs Branch Director in Acres Homes with Magnus Sevcik.

Larry Barnes (left), Salvation Army Boys and Girls Clubs Branch Director in Acres Homes with Magnus Sevcik.

HOUSTON HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR DONATES THIRD LITTLE FREE LIBRARY TO ACRES HOMES

Houston Christian High School Junior Magnus Sevcik has donated his third Little Free Library to Houston’s Acres Homes neighborhood. Two Little Free Libraries will now reside at the neighborhood Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club.

Little Free Libraries are stand-alone boxes holding up to 25 books at a time usually in a public place. Users are encouraged to take a book or leave a book, keeping the circulation of literature among community members constant.

“The kids love having the opportunity to come by and pick their favorite books in the library and take them home” says Tanya Dixon of Good Gains, an Acres Homes non-profit. “Even when kids say they don’t like reading, I’ve noticed the only reason they don’t like it is because they have never had the opportunity to read a good book or a book that suits their particular interests. The Little Free Library has definitely provided that opportunity. We make sure the libraries are placed in areas that do not have as many resources readily available. We look for places where parents may not have the time or money to be able to take their kids to the library or buy books for them.”

“I started raising money for a Little Free Library in eighth grade because I felt my neighborhood could use one. After we installed it, it became so popular I felt I could do more,” says Sevcik. “I wanted to help other neighborhoods without as many resources. I started working to install as many Little Free libraries as I could in an area close to my home that I felt deserved easy access to books. My goal is to raise money to open and install a total of 10 libraries in Acres Homes, a community just 20 minutes from my front door.”

 

Cy-Fair Schools, Sports, Students December 2016


Category: Schools, Sports, Students

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