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Cy-Fair Schools, Sports, Students December 2017

| December 1, 2017

(L-R): Roy Garcia, Teri Goins, Principal Kim Dameron, paraprofessional Emily Zavala and Dr. Carla Brosnahan.

(L-R): Roy Garcia, Teri Goins, Principal Kim Dameron, paraprofessional Emily Zavala and Dr. Carla Brosnahan.

WALKER ES STAFF MEMBERS RECOGNIZED AFTER COMING TO COLLEAGUE’S AID

With much of her Walker Elementary School staff in the library waiting a morning training session, an announcement over the campus intercom called for Principal Kim Dameron to rush over.

She quickly walked over, only to be caught off guard when teachers and staff members stood accompanied by Dr. Carla Brosnahan, assistant superintendent of elementary administration, and Roy Garcia, associate superintendent of school administration and leadership development.

That’s when Dameron and campus paraprofessional Emily Zavala were each presented with a Superintendent’s Challenge Coin. The two helped save the life of Walker Elementary School teacher Teri Goins, who didn’t report to work Sept. 12 and was unconscious in bed and beyond a state of diabetic shock when Dameron and Zavala found her.

Dameron and Zavala were in contact with Goins’ family and were able to find medical glucose, bring Goins out of unconsciousness and offer comfort until an ambulance arrived.

“I remember how soothing Kim and Emily were to me, how they were both sitting on the bed with me, they were rubbing my head and holding my hand,” Goins said. “They stayed with me until they knew I was alright and that my mom was going to stay with me.”

Garcia described the coin during the ceremony – “Superintendent Outstanding Performance Award” is inscribed on an outside ring, circling the coin’s meaning. It states: “This challenge coin is presented for extraordinary contributions to the students and state of our district.”

Said Dameron on how she felt while Garcia spoke: “A principal’s job is to lead with heart. Heart for not only the students but the staff also. Something was not right and I was not just going to sit around to wait. I did what any principal in this district would do. I was proud to stand by Emily and so happy that she was recognized.”

There were tears in the library, not only as Goins, Dameron and Zavala relived the day, but also from a number of staff who didn’t know what happened to their colleague. They shared hugs and took plenty of photos before restarting their training session.

“The coin was extremely special and I am truly thankful for the recognition,” Dameron said. “Taking care of people is what we do best. My students and staff are always a priority.”

Said Goins: “My Walker family means the world to me. If everyone at Walker wasn’t close like we all are, Kim and Emily wouldn’t have been able to come help me. Kim knew she could depend on everyone else to manage things while she was gone and my pre-kindergarten team took over and covered for both Emily and me. This says so much about the people that are here at Walker.”

Bridgeland.com

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Cypress Woods High School sophomore Alysha Obeius (second from left) and her father Alaysius (left) speak with representatives from Lone Star College-Tomball’s Veterinary Technology program.

Cypress Woods High School sophomore Alysha Obeius (second from left) and her father Alaysius (left) speak with representatives from Lone Star College-Tomball’s Veterinary Technology program.

CAREER OPTIONS FAIR DRAWS MORE THAN 1,200 VISITORS

A total of 1,250 middle school and high school students and parents learned about career and technical programs and industry certification opportunities at the fourth annual Career Options Fair, held Oct. 24 at the Berry Center.

All 18 of CFISD’s career and technical education (CTE) programs and AFJROTC were represented by teachers and high school students. The programs included: agriculture; architecture/construction; automotive; audio/video productions (AVP); child guidance; computer science; cosmetology; culinary arts; education and training; engineering; fashion; general business/marketing; health science; interior design; manufacturing; multimedia; networking; and welding.

Visitors also had the opportunity to speak with representatives from various trade and technical school, as well as companies and career opportunities that were in attendance.

“It starts those conversations early – at the middle school level – so it gives students a different outlook that there are more options than just a four-year
university,” said Lisa Hernandez, coordinator for career and technology education. “It could be a
technical school; it could be going straight into an industry. We can get those kids certifications and the industry experience they need to go straight into the workforce, college and career ready. This event does just that.”

Delmy Rodriguez attended with her son Nicolas, a sixth-grade student at Kahla Middle School, to help introduce him to various career options.

“This helped show him what may pique his interest or show things that he could do,” Rodriguez said. “This was interesting. It’s nice that they have this because it gives you some relief to the thought of ‘What am I going to do after high school?’ It gives some ideas and things you can ponder and play around with.”

The collaborative event was presented by CFISD’s college and career specialists and CTE coordinators.

“It encompasses that there’s opportunity for everyone but it also encompasses that this is an opportunity at every single one of our high schools,” Hernandez said.

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Cypress Ranch tennis players celebrate the team’s deepest run in program history at the George P. Mitchell Tennis Center on Nov. 2.

Cypress Ranch tennis players celebrate the team’s deepest run in program history at the George P. Mitchell Tennis Center on Nov. 2.

CYPRESS RANCH ENDS HISTORIC FALL SEASON AS STATE RUNNER-UP

The Cypress Ranch High School tennis team ended its deepest fall run in program history in the UIL Team Tennis State Tournament, losing 11-5 to Memorial in the state championship on Nov. 2 at Texas A&M University’s George P. Mitchell Tennis Center.

The Mustangs (23-2) defeated Plano West in the semifinal on Nov. 1, 10-5, to advance to the championship. It was their first-ever trip to the state tournament in the fall.

“We had a goal when I came in to take over at Cy Ranch six years ago,” said Minh Phan, Cypress Ranch head tennis coach. “The past three years we made it to the regional final twice, and finally this third time, we made it here. It’s super tough in our region to make it out here.”

The matchup remained close through the doubles matches, with Cypress Ranch sweeping the boys’ flights to trail Memorial 4-3 at the break. Memorial responded, however, by winning seven of the next nine singles’ matches to clinch the state title.

As the Mustangs will now prepare for the spring tennis season, Phan said he is hopeful for another return trip to state next fall.

“I’m just excited for the kids,” he said. “They smell it, they want it, and we have a lot of kids coming back next year. I’m very optimistic about our chances to come back next year and take it all the way.”

Complete tournament results can be found on the UIL website.

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Langham Creek senior Niko Forlini (left) speaks with Engineer Your World symposium visitor Dr. Clay Anderson. Forlini and partner Prab Rai designed and constructed a pinhole camera that works with disabled individuals with limited hand dexterity.

Langham Creek senior Niko Forlini (left) speaks with Engineer Your World symposium visitor Dr. Clay Anderson. Forlini and partner Prab Rai designed and constructed a pinhole camera that works with disabled individuals with limited hand dexterity.

STUDENTS EMBRACE LEARNING THROUGH ENGINEER YOUR WORLD CURRICULUM

CFISD high school students in engineering and problem solving classes wrapped up their first design challenge of the year, through the University of Texas’ UTeach Engineering curriculum program, Engineer Your World.

Engineer Your World is made possible though a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant. The innovative, year-long high school course is for students who want to learn about engineering and its role in shaping the world. The 2017-2018 school year marks the fifth year for the course to be offered.

In the initial design challenge, The Evolution of Imagery, students were tasked with building a pinhole camera for an arts program that works with disabled individuals with limited hand dexterity.

Langham Creek High School students in Marissa Logrono’s three class periods presented their designs in a symposium for professional engineers, guests, parents and community members on Nov. 2. The presentations were a “real-life” element Logrono wanted to add to the challenge.

“The technical requirement is a written set of manufacturing and user instructions,” Logrono said. “For me, I just really feel strongly that although that step is important, in the real world, you would never just deliver that to a client and say, ‘Here’s the stuff.’ You’re going to have to talk to them.

“When (engineering firms) saw what they were doing, they were so impressed with the students’ ability to gauge their audience and being to talk with whoever it was, whether it be their mom or an engineer,” said Lyons.

Representatives from Flotek were among the visitors who circled the room asking questions to students as they presented their designs, photographs and research.

Also among the visitors was Dr. Clay Anderson, a science teacher at Kinkaid School, which is scheduled to begin the program next school year.

“I’m very impressed with the student engagement. They have some ownership and you can tell that they spend some time on these projects,” said Anderson, who has his doctoral degree in engineering. “One of my concerns is how much engineering rigor is in the curriculum – my tendency is to try and prepare students for the rigor that they’re going to see. It seems like it gives a great picture of what it’s like to be an engineer.”

Engineer Your World curriculum is in more than 150 schools across the country including CFISD high schools, and is offered with a dual enrollment option so students can earn three engineering elective credits at UT system schools. Marie Girardot, recruitment support specialist for the program, attended the Langham Creek symposium.

Seniors Lauryn Davis and Haley Habetz partnered in the project, sharing their thoughts that the best – and worst – part of the challenge was actually taking the photographs.

“It was really stressful whenever we would go into the darkroom to develop our pictures and it would be black,” Davis said. “But the best part was also the same thing – taking the pictures.”

Added Habetz: “Once it did turn out, you’d say to yourself, ‘Finally, this is what we’ve been working for this whole time.’ And some came out really good.”

It’s come a long way from the small group of students Logrono had her first year teaching the program. But it’s allowed Logrono to bring real life to the classroom.

“One of the things that I really like about this particular course is it is a really nice overview or snapshot of many of the things that any profession is going to see,” she said. “Not just the science class. Not just a technology class. Not just an English class.

“I ask them to take what they learned about technical writing in English, what they learned about physics, what they learned about algebra and what they learned about this, and bring it all together.”


Category: Around Cy-Fair, Schools, Sports, Students

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