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Cy-Fair Schools, Sports, Students January 2018

| February 1, 2018

CFISD teamed with the City of Houston Health Department’s See to Succeed program for a second year, providing free comprehensive eye exams and eyewear to approximately 1,600 students from Jan. 8-11 at the Berry Center.

CFISD teamed with the City of Houston Health Department’s See to Succeed program for a second year, providing free comprehensive eye exams and eyewear to approximately 1,600 students from Jan. 8-11 at the Berry Center.

CFISD COLLABORATES WITH CITY OF HOUSTON FOR SEE TO SUCCEED INITIATIVE FOR STUDENTS

Following a very successful first year, CFISD bussed even more students – approximately 1,600 – to the Berry Center from Jan. 8-11 for free comprehensive eye exams and eyewear provided by the Harris County Health Department’s See to Succeed program.

The See to Succeed program partners with several organizations and community volunteers throughout the area to organize weeklong vision clinics for students between the ages of 6 to 18 who have not passed state-mandated vision screenings initiated by school nurses.

Transporting CFISD students to the clinics presented logistical and scheduling issues, but See to Succeed acquired mobile vision exam equipment. That allowed team members, volunteers and vision professionals to travel and establish more remote locations.

And in the case of CFISD, that meant setting up the program at the Berry Center. Approximately 400 students per day were examined and fitted for glasses over the four days at no cost to participating families. Due to the increase, a separate See to Succeed program will be set up at Fiest Elementary School to serve the high demand on that campus.

The total increased from the roughly 1,100 students that participated a year ago.

According to Bevin Gordon, CFISD’s director for health services, approximately 5,500 students within the district will fail the state-mandated vision screening each year.

And from those, roughly half would not get a professional eye examination to address the issues.

“This event breaks down transportation and economic barriers. Parents don’t have to leave work or earnings to allow their students access to a professional eye exam and glasses,” said Gordon, adding last year’s initial program led to a significant reduction in student cases that went unresolved. “Now, parents can trust See to Succeed and their partners to help their children.”

Each day of the four began with eligible students shuttled by CFISD buses to and from their campuses to the Berry Center. Upon arrival, See to Succeed employees and volunteers greeted the students and led them to the auditorium for registration as well as distributing stickers for each to help identify students throughout the day. The process was broken down into stations, including pre-screening rooms and waiting areas, before each student would ultimately visit with an eye doctor.

Stations included distance acuity, color, stereo, near point of accommodation and conversion, slit lamp, auto refraction and refraction, optical frame selection, check out and data entry.

If a student needed an immediate referral or follow-up consultation, program workers were ready to call parents and guardians. Three urgent cases were caught in the first two days.

“The primary focus of the event is to address visual disturbances to increase academic success, but the optometry staff sometimes discover medical issues that can affect vision,” Gordon said. “Addressing some of these medical concerns can prevent permanent vision loss.”

Added Dr. Denetrice Coleman, an optometrist who has worked with the program for more than three years, “It really means a lot to work with students. Our initiative is See to Succeed and unless you can see, how can you succeed? It can make a world of difference. It’s unfair for a child to think that they can’t compete with others because they’re not aware of a vision issue.”

The entire screening process lasted between 2-4 hours per student. During their time at the Berry Center, students were accompanied by CFISD clinic assistants, who joined them as chaperones. Breakfast and lunch were provided to students by the CFISD nutrition services department to ensure meals were not missed as a result of a student being at the Berry Center.

The partnership with CFISD and its personnel made the four-day operation a smooth success, said See to Succeed Manager Patricia Watson.

Participating students will have eyeglasses delivered to their home campuses in roughly four weeks, a part of the process almost more rewarding as helping each student through his or her exam.

“We had a child put his hand in front of his face and he said, ‘I have lines on my hand?’” Watson said, reenacting the student’s gasp and surprise. “He couldn’t see them. Or having a child say he or she can actually see the board.”

The See to Succeed program has been in operation from its primary Heights location by the City of Houston Health Department since 2007.

Since its start, the program has screened more than 22,000 children and distributed over 19,000 glasses to those in need. See to Succeed program partners include the Houston Department of Health and Human Services, University of Houston, San Jacinto College, Berkeley Eye Center, public and private schools, as well as community volunteers from across the Houston area. For more information, visit See to Succeed at HoustonService.org.

More than 220 City of Houston employees and volunteers assisted with the See to Succeed program Jan. 8-11 at the Berry Center, including pre-screening stations.

More than 220 City of Houston employees and volunteers assisted with the See to Succeed program Jan. 8-11 at the Berry Center, including pre-screening stations.

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Stations were set up for each student in the pre-screening process for the See to Succeed program, moving each from room to room inside the Berry Center. The stations included stops to check distance acuity, color, and near point of accommodation and conversion.

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(Front row, l-r): Isabel Ray, Maren Mullally, Jessica Sackschewsky, Madison Kippes, Madison Gvist; (middle row): Erica Barfield, Julia Rock, Katy Thomas, Hannah Haesly, Kathryn Motsinger, Emily Estes, Lexi Angelica, Ashley Bruton; (back row): Caitlyn Schade, Hallie Bruton, Sarah Theriot, Shannon Hebert, Maggie Lucas, Lexie Hluchanek, Jensen MacLeod, Anna Kolodziejcyk and Becky Clark.

(Front row, l-r): Isabel Ray, Maren Mullally, Jessica Sackschewsky, Madison Kippes, Madison Gvist; (middle row): Erica Barfield, Julia Rock, Katy Thomas, Hannah Haesly, Kathryn Motsinger, Emily Estes, Lexi Angelica, Ashley Bruton; (back row): Caitlyn Schade, Hallie Bruton, Sarah Theriot, Shannon Hebert, Maggie Lucas, Lexie Hluchanek, Jensen MacLeod, Anna Kolodziejcyk and Becky Clark.

NCL CYPRESS GEMS CHAPTER RECOGNIZES SENIORS

Twenty-two young women in the senior class of the Cypress Gems Chapter of National Charity League were recently recognized for their outstanding community service. At a formal event held in the Norris Conference Center, the Cypress Gems graduating class of 2018 were presented by their families and honored for their contributions to their chapter and their communities.

National Charity League is a mother-daughter service organization committed to fostering the mother-daughter relationship through community service, leadership development, and cultural experiences. Alongside their mothers, the 2018 class have performed over 3,000 hours of community service. Their work has benefitted multiple Houston area nonprofit organizations such as Reach Unlimited, Houston Food Bank, and Cy-Hope Disaster Relief. The Cypress Gems chapter comprises girls attending Cypress Ranch, Cypress Woods, Cypress Fairbanks and Bridgeland High Schools.

“I could not be more proud of these senior girls and the accomplishments they have achieved over the past year,” said Elizabeth Franklin, Cypress Gems Chapter president. “Every single one of them have worked hard to be remarkable role models for our younger members and to truly demonstrate the embodiment of what NCL is about.”

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Cypress Woods High School senior Cate Reese (34).

Cypress Woods High School senior Cate Reese (34).

CY WOODS BASKETBALL STAR NAMED TO MCDONALD’S ALL-AMERICAN GAME

Cypress Woods High School senior Cate Reese was named to the 2018 McDonald’s All-American Basketball Game on Tuesday, Jan. 16, joining one of her former teammates and other former notable CFISD hoops standouts named to the prestigious all-star game.

“I was so excited to find out that I was chosen because it’s been a dream of mine for such a long time,” Reese said. “I’m just so happy and blessed to be chosen over a bunch of other girls that have worked just as hard as me for this prestigious honor.”

Reese has been a mainstay for the Cypress Woods basketball team since her freshman year. The 6-foot-3 forward was the District 17-6A Newcomer of the Year in 2015, helping lead the Wildcats to the Class 6A state championship. She was the district’s Most Valuable Player in 2016, has earned all-region honors from the Texas Association of Basketball Coaches (TABC) three times and is a two-time all-state pick by both TABC and the Texas Girls Coaches Association.

A five-star recruit, Reese is currently rated 14th nationally for the Class of 2018 according to ESPN.com and the country’s fourth-best forward in her class. She signed with the University of Arizona in November, becoming the highest-ranked signee in program history.

Reese is averaging 29.8 points and 14.6 rebounds per game for Cypress Woods through her selection and recently eclipsed the 2,000-point mark in becoming the Wildcats’ all-time leading scorer.

Reese is the fourth McDonald’s All-American from CFISD in just the last three years. Among the past honorees is Nancy Mulkey (2016), who played alongside Reese for two seasons at Cypress Woods and helped lead the Wildcats to a Class 6A state championship in 2015. Former Cypress Ranch High School standout DiDi Richards was an All-American in 2017, while former Cypress Lakes High School star De’Aaron Fox joined Mulkey as a 2016 honoree.

“It’s always been a goal,” Reese said. “Looking up at other people and watching the game. Now that it’s finally come true, it feels so surreal.”

The 2018 McDonald’s All-American Games will be played March 28 at Phillips Arena in Atlanta. The girls’ game is scheduled to begin at 4 p.m. and will air live on ESPN2.

 

 

 


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