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Cy-Fair Schools, Sports, Students October 2017

| October 1, 2017

Nia Miranda (right) is interviewed after winning the U.S. Marine Corps Cadet and Women’s Junior National Championship’s 144-pound weight division in July in Fargo, SD. The sophomore was a state qualifier for Cypress Ranch High School last year.

Nia Miranda (right) is interviewed after winning the U.S. Marine Corps Cadet and Women’s Junior National Championship’s 144-pound weight division in July in Fargo, SD. The sophomore was a state qualifier for Cypress Ranch High School last year.

CYPRESS RANCH WRESTLER ENDS SUMMER WITH NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

Nia Miranda, a sophomore at Cypress Ranch High School, claimed a national title during the summer, winning the U.S. Marine Corps Cadet and Women’s Junior National Championship’s 144-pound weight division in July in Fargo, South Dakota.

A state qualifier as a freshman, Miranda beat McKenzie Cook of Alaska by the decision 4-1 to claim the national championship.

“I had many goals but winning a national championship wasn’t one only because I thought it was out of my reach,” Miranda said. “But I did what little I knew how to do to the best of my ability and made it.”

She claimed the lone first-place finish for Team Texas but helped it record 71 points for its best finish in tournament history (second place behind California). Team Texas had 21 participants to 28 by California, but saw nearly half (10) place, with nine finishing among the top five in their respective divisions.

“The road to get there was pretty difficult (and) I had to learn to believe in myself and my abilities,” said Miranda, who added a change in her thinking and having confidence helped break through mental barriers. “But luckily for me, I had an amazing support system including my parents and encouraging coaches by my side through everything and pushing me to work harder.”

Cypress Ranch wrestling coach Christopher Potter said he knew as far back as last year’s first week that Miranda was going to be a tough competitor. She matches asking the right questions with an unbelievable work ethic, he said, only lacking the self-confidence to succeed at a higher level. That came out on the road to the national championship.

“The sky is the limit for Nia,” Potter said. “She still has so much to learn technically and is still learning her body and mat awareness. If she continues to work like she has been then I see multiple championships at any level where she wants to compete.”

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Smith Middle School sixth-grader Jada Arm­strong (center) with two other Education in Action’s summer 2017 Lone Star Leadership Academy participants during a Houston/Galveston camp stop to Moody Gardens.

Smith Middle School sixth-grader Jada Arm­strong (center) with two other Education in Action’s summer 2017 Lone Star Leadership Academy participants during a Houston/Galveston camp stop to Moody Gardens.

CFISD STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN LONE STAR LEADERSHIP ACADEMIES

Seventeen CFISD students participated in Education in Action’s summer 2017 Lone Star Leadership Academy camps based on their outstanding academic success, demonstrated leadership ability, involvement in school and community activities, and nominations from their principals.

The CFISD representatives joined a delegation of outstanding students from across the state to develop leadership skills while learning about the state of Texas and its leaders. D’Angelo Wilkerson, now a sophomore at Cypress Springs High School, was among 28 student alumni to serve in a leadership role as a youth facilitator.

The following students participated in the academics at three different sites from June 3-Aug. 10: Kayleigh White, sixth grade, Aragon Middle School – Austin/San Antonio; Daniela Lopez, eighth grade, Campbell Middle School – Houston/Galveston; Camryn Kelly, seventh grade, Cook Middle School – Houston/Galveston; Gwen Tompkins, fifth grade, Copeland Elementary School – Austin/San Antonio; D’Angelo Wilkerson, ninth grade, Cypress Springs High School – Austin/San Antonio; Abigail Behrens, sixth grade, Goodson Middle School – Houston/Gal­veston; Cheyenne Landgraf, sixth grade, Goodson Middle School – Houston/Galveston; Joshua Rivera, fourth grade, Millsap Elementary School – Dallas/Fort Worth; Lorelai Bargas, fifth grade, Postma Elementary School – Dallas/Fort Worth; Sofia Rivas, fifth grade, Postma Elementary School – Dallas/Fort Worth; Jada Armstrong, sixth grade, Smith Middle School – Houston/Galveston; Jasmine Pace, sixth grade, Thornton Middle School – Houston/Galveston; Jahnaye Sanchez, sixth grade, Truitt Middle School – Austin/San Antonio; Olivia Shook, sixth grade, Truitt Middle School – Austin/San Antonio; Lyla Guess, fifth grade, Woodard Elementary School – Dallas/Fort Worth; Kole Krause, fifth grade, Woodard Elementary School – Dallas/Fort Worth; and Madison Wallace, fifth grade, Woodard Elementary School – Dallas/Fort Worth.

The Lone Star Leadership Academy provides students a unique opportunity to learn about Texas leaders and what it means to be from Texas.

Venues these distinguished students experienced during the camps included the offices of participants’ state legislators at the Texas State Capitol, The Bullock Texas State History Museum, bat watching on the Lone Star Riverboat, and The Alamo on the Austin/San Antonio program; the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the Fort Worth Stockyards National Historic District, and the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza on the Dallas/Fort Worth program; and NASA, a boat tour of Galveston Bay with a marine biologist, the San Jacinto Battleground Monument, and Moody Gardens on the Houston/Galveston program.

Put together into Leadership Groups, participants completed problem-solving and decision-making simulations, exercised creativity and practiced presentation skills.

In addition, professionals at sites visited and speakers introduced participants to a wide variety of unique career and internship opportunities during each camp.

Education in Action is a nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering young people to become informed and active leaders in their communities. For more information, visit educationinaction.org.

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Cherease Lamm, a senior at Cypress Ranch High School selected for the NASA High School Aerospace Scholars, takes part in the summer program closing ceremony, where she was 1 of 3 scholars to represent their respective teams and discuss their projects and experiences with NASA officials.

Cherease Lamm, a senior at Cypress Ranch High School selected for the NASA High School Aerospace Scholars, takes part in the summer program closing ceremony, where she was 1 of 3 scholars to represent their respective teams and discuss their projects and experiences with NASA officials.

CYPRESS RANCH SENIOR PARTICIPATES IN NASA AEROSPACE SCHOLARS PROGRAM

Cherease Lamm, a senior at Cypress Ranch High School, recently participated and excelled in the NASA High School Aerospace Scholars, which included a weeklong residential summer program where she helped design and make a model to represent a capsule astronauts would take to Mars.

Lamm qualified through a competitive selection process where she not only needed an expressed interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (S.T.E.M.), but also be nominated by a state legislator.

“As a child, Cherease has always been curious about space and how things are designed,” said Donna Lamm, Cherease’s mother and a teacher at Postma Elementary School. “Her grand-uncle worked at NASA, her uncle is an engineer and her dad owns a manufacturing/machine company. Consequently, she is always surrounded by engineering-related talk.”

Scholars selected for the program completed a four-month online portion during the 2016-2017 school year, with NASA activities and a state-aligned curriculum focusing on Earth, Aeronautics, Interna­tional Space Station, Journey to Mars, and the Solar System.

Lamm’s excellence in the online portion earned her an all-expenses-paid spot in June at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. There, she and other scholars were placed into teams to complete a Mars mission design challenge. They also completed hands-on activities to support the research, including building and launching rockets, and toured the center facilities.

Lamm was eventually one of three scholars to represent their respective teams at the closing ceremony and discuss their progress, projects and experiences with NASA engineers, education specialists, scientists, mentors and families of the aerospace scholars.

“It was truly a proud moment for both her dad and me,” Donna said. “I was particularly touched when she sent home pictures of her launching her team’s rocket on the same launching pad that was used to launch other NASA spacecrafts. Her pictures reflected how special this opportunity was for her.”

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Jim and Pam Wells (center), who served a combined 66 years in CFISD and are the namesakes of the new school, join Wells Elementary School Principal Cheryl Fisher (teal shirt) in greeting students and families on the first day of classes.

Jim and Pam Wells (center), who served a combined 66 years in CFISD and are the namesakes of the new school, join Wells Elementary School Principal Cheryl Fisher (teal shirt) in greeting students and families on the first day of classes.

CFISD WELCOMES STUDENTS ON FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL

Cheryl Fisher’s Fitbit says she slept four hours, but the principal at brand-new Wells Elementary School was pretty sure it was less.

The first day of school still has that effect on Fisher. Despite a start date pushed back two weeks due to the effects of Hurricane Harvey, CFISD classes began Sept. 11, with approximately 116,000 students filling the halls of 91 campuses.

That included three new schools: Wells and Hoover elementary schools and Bridgeland High School. For those teachers, staff members and administrators, reaching the first day of classes marked an accomplishment in itself.

“Seeing those kids come in the first day of school with their smiles – that would be the pot of gold at the end of this whole thing,” said Fisher, who spent eight years as the principal at Keith Elementary School before she was named to her new post.

“Whenever you have a new school, you have to be flexible,” said Michael Smith, Bridgeland’s principal after more than nine years at the same job at Cy-Fair High School. “Not everything went perfect, but the staff and the students were great. ”

The first day also meant bridging CFISD’s history with its future as the namesakes of both new elementary schools were on hand, welcoming students in the morning before walking the halls and returning to volunteer as Bus Buddies in the afternoon.

CFISD’s original start date was Aug. 28, but was postponed due to Hurricane Harvey. The district and community rallied and did its part while employees, families and students waited to start the 2017-2018 school year. The Berry Center transformed into a massive point of distribution center with a workforce of CFISD volunteers, funneling donations to families in need. In addition, numerous school organizations and athletics teams volunteered in the relief effort.

But the waiting finally ended. School buses and lines of cars rolled in on Sept. 11. Students posed for photos. Smiling employees greeted everyone at the front doors.

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(L-R): Dr. Jeanette Gerault, principal of Fiest Elementary School and Dr. Laura Perry, principal of Campbell Middle School, deliver supplies to Moore teachers’ classrooms at the old Matzke Elementary School building on Sept. 3.

(L-R): Dr. Jeanette Gerault, principal of Fiest Elementary School and Dr. Laura Perry, principal of Campbell Middle School, deliver supplies to Moore teachers’ classrooms at the old Matzke Elementary School building on Sept. 3.

COMMUNITY, FELLOW EDUCA­TORS RALLY AROUND DISPLACED MOORE ES STAFF

After the flood waters receded and Moore Elementary School Principal Patricia Myers was able to walk through her building on Sept. 1, she was floored by what she saw.

“I can’t even describe how devastating that was,” Myers said. “I drove up to the parking lot and there was a mound 10 feet high of demolished cabinets and furniture and boxes of supplies.”

CFISD’s facilities team made the determination earlier in the week that the campus would need to be shut down for months while undergoing a large-scale renovation project. Moore was relocated to the vacant old Matzke Elementary School building at 13102 Jones Road, but many staff members were left with nothing from their classrooms.

“Having to communicate to my staff that you may be able to save a few things from your room and it will be boxed up for you, that was devastating to them,” Myers said.

Myers’ colleagues quickly rose to the occasion. Matzke Principal Cathy Jacobs organized a volunteer sign-up with principals around the district, who dispatched staff to the old Matzke over the weekend to oversee a supply drive and help Moore teachers set up their new rooms.

“Every principal in the school district wanted to help,” Jacobs said. “I knew that was going to be a little overwhelming for the Moore staff, so I took that off Patricia’s plate. Our Matzke staff came in, they went to the room they were assigned to last year and helped the teachers set up their new classrooms.”

Community members came by Moore’s new home in droves, dropping off everything from books to classroom decorations to art supplies. Neighboring campus Cypress Creek High School hosted a supply drive on Sept. 4 to help replenish the Moore educators.

Thanks to the volunteers and donors, many of the Moore classrooms at the old Matzke building were ready to welcome students to their new learning environment on Sept. 11.


Category: Around Cy-Fair, Schools, Sports, Students

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